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Managing the Next Domestic Catastrophe: Ready (or Not)? Christine Wormuth

Managing the Next Domestic Catastrophe: Ready (or Not)?

Christine Wormuth

Published May 30th 2008
ISBN : 9780892065349
Paperback
104 pages
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 About the Book 

America is not ready for the next catastrophe. Almost seven years have passed since the nation was attacked here at home by violent Islamist extremists who remain free and who have made clear their willingness to use weapons of mass destructionMoreAmerica is not ready for the next catastrophe. Almost seven years have passed since the nation was attacked here at home by violent Islamist extremists who remain free and who have made clear their willingness to use weapons of mass destruction against the United States, should they be able to acquire or build them. Almost three years have passed since Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast and laid bare myriad flaws in the nation s preparedness and response system. Simply creating the Homeland Security Council, the Department of Homeland Security, and U.S. Northern Command was not enough to make the country prepared. There are still no detailed, government-wide plans to respond to a catastrophe. There is still considerable confusion over who will be in charge during a disaster. There are still almost no dedicated military forces on rapid alert to respond to a crisis here at home. There are still no guidelines to determine and assess the capabilities that states, cities, and towns should have to ensure they are prepared for the worst. Many of the building blocks required to move the country toward being truly prepared to handle a catastrophe already exist in some form, but the next administration needs to bring the pieces together, fill in the gaps, and provide the resources necessary to get the job done. If implemented, the recommendations contained in this report--part of the CSIS Beyond Goldwater-Nichols project--would go a long way toward getting America ready to manage the next domestic catastrophe, whatever form it might take.