Home » Defunct Pharmacies of the United States: Revco, Eckerd Corporation, Pay n Save, Perry Drug Stores, Longs Drugs, Brooks Pharmacy, Rexall by Books LLC
Defunct Pharmacies of the United States: Revco, Eckerd Corporation, Pay n Save, Perry Drug Stores, Longs Drugs, Brooks Pharmacy, Rexall Books LLC

Defunct Pharmacies of the United States: Revco, Eckerd Corporation, Pay n Save, Perry Drug Stores, Longs Drugs, Brooks Pharmacy, Rexall

Books LLC

Published August 13th 2011
ISBN : 9781155178813
Paperback
26 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: Revco, Eckerd Corporation, Pay n Save, Perry Drug Stores, Longs Drugs, Brooks Pharmacy, Rexall,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: Revco, Eckerd Corporation, Pay n Save, Perry Drug Stores, Longs Drugs, Brooks Pharmacy, Rexall, Cunningham Drug, Thrifty PayLess, Phar-Mor, Peoples Drug, G. O. Guy, Skaggs Companies, Hooks Drug Stores, Drug Fair, K&B, Drug Emporium, Genovese Drug Stores, Standard Drug Company, Dr. H. Huber Block, Fays Drug, Dorb the Chemist, Inc., Arbor Drugs, Schwabs Pharmacy, Kinsley & Darling Druggists, Hugh Mercer Apothecary, Rhodes Pharmacy, Fairchild Brothers & Foster, Wellby Super Drug, Dart Drug, Thrift Drug, Big B Drugs, Tams Gold Seal Drugs, Lane Drug Stores, IDL Drug Stores. Excerpt: Revco Discount Drug Stores (known simply as Revco or Revco, D.S.), once based in Twinsburg, Ohio, was a major drug store chain operating through the Ohio Valley, the Mid-Atlantic states, and the Southeastern United States. The chains stock was traded on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the ticker RXR. When it was sold, the chain had over 2,500 stores. Revco, originally known as Registered Vitamin Company, was founded in 1956 in Detroit, Michigan by Sidney Dworkin and Bernie Shulman. Dworkin led Revco until 1986 as CEO, and then he served as Chairman until 1987. Up to 1983, Revco grew tremendously- the chain had over 2,200 stores and over $2.2 billion dollars in sales. The chain then began to stumble. In 1983, its vitamins were blamed for the deaths of 38 infants. In order to prevent a hostile takeover and increase short-term profitability, Dworkin then led the chain into a deal that would seal its fate many years later. Under his leadership, Revco purchased a company called Odd Lots, now known as Big Lots, a closeout retailer. Revcos management lost its focus on the drug store portion of its business due to problems with Odd Lots, and earnings tumbled. The chain also began to merchandise items such as televisions, furniture, an...